The Isle of Bute ( Scottish Gaelic: Eilean Bhòid )A small Island on the west of Scotland ( Gaelic: Alba ) lies in the Firth of Clyde, squeezed in between the landmass of Ayrshire in the East and the magnificent sea lochs of southern Argyll. It stretches about 15 miles from the most northern point near Rhubodach to its southern end, and approximately 4 miles wide. The island is rather flat, with Windy Hill (278m) being its highest elevation. The main town is Rothesay on the eastern shore of the island.

The Village of Rothesay is the main population centre on the eastern shore of the Isle Of Bute, overlooking the Clyde of Firth with the Cowal peninsula on the horizon, Facing the mainland of Scotland.The Isle of Bute ( Scottish Gaelic: Eilean Bhòid ) started about 5500 years ago, when first settlers arrived at the island. Evidence of those early inhabitants can still be found on many places, e.g. the Standing Stones at St. Ninians Bay or the vitrified fort at Dunagoil Bay. Over the next centuries the isle became home to the Scottish kings of Stuart, who in around 1200 built Rothesay Castle as their main residence, around 1300 the Clan of the Stuart began to build a castle on the bay which is now the location of the village.

The Isle of Bute ( Scottish Gaelic: Eilean Bhòid ) started about 5500 years ago, when first settlers arrived at the island. Evidence of those early inhabitants can still be found on many places, e.g. the Standing Stones at St. Ninians Bay or the vitrified fort at Dunagoil Bay. Over the next centuries the isle became home to the Scottish kings of Stuart, who in around 1200 built Rothesay Castle as their main residence, around 1300 the Clan of the Stuart began to build a castle on the bay which is now the location of the village. The Village of Rothesay ( Scottish Gaelic: Baile Bhòid ) is the main population centre on the eastern shore of the island of Bute, overlooking the Clyde of Firth with the Cowal peninsula on the horizon.

It is likely that before the Gaels arrived and absorbed Bute into the Cenél Comgall of Dál Riata the island was home to a people who spoke a Brythonic language (akin to modern day Welsh). Later during the Viking period the island was known as Rothesay, a name deriving from a personal name and Old Norse ey, 'an island'. This name eventually came to refer to the main town on the island, which was later also known in Gaelic as Baile Bhòid, or in Scots the toun of Bute in the sixteenth century - that is to say 'the town of the island of Bute'. It was, indeed, the only town on the island. But the town itself has never actually been called 'Bute'.
After the Viking period the island was not granted to the Lord of the Isles, as were most of the islands off Scotland's west coast. Instead Bute became the personal property of the Scottish monarchy.
In the 1940s and 1950s Bute served as a large naval headquarters. During World War II it housed a large camp for officers and NCOs of the Polish Armed Forces in the West. Officially a military camp, it was unofficially thought of as a prison for Władysław Sikorski's political enemies







Rothesay
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Bute is divided in two by the Highland Boundary Fault. North of the fault the island is hilly and largely uncultivated with extensive areas of forestry. The highest hill is Kames Hill at 267 metres. To the south of the fault the terrain is smoother and highly cultivated although in the far south is to be found the island's most rugged terrain around Glen Callum. Loch Fad is Bute's largest body of freshwater and runs along the fault line
The western side of Bute is known for its beaches, many of which enjoy fine views over the Sound of Bute towards Arran and Bute's smaller satellite island Inchmarnock. Villages on the western side of the island include Straad, around St. Ninian's Bay, and Kildavanan on Ettrick Bay.
In the north, Bute is separated from the Cowal peninsula by the Kyles of Bute. The northern part of the island is sparsely populated, and the ferry terminal at Rhubodach connects the island to the mainland at Colintraive by the smaller of the island's two ferries. The crossing is one of the shortest, less than 300 metres (330 yd), and takes only a few minutes but is busy because many tourists prefer the scenic route to the island.
North Bute forms part of the Kyles of Bute National Scenic Area, one of 40 in Scotland
Rothesay